9.16.2019

The VanVranken house

Map Zillow

The VanVranken house outside of Hastings Michigan has a huge front porch. In the summer they would cool off there and a safe place for the children to play. This is the VanVranken house. In it is my grandmother as a child, my great grandparents and my great, great grandparents. It was in our family for about 100 years. Joe Beach is the owner. 27 acres. Sold for 339K in 2019.






9.04.2019

QSR - DIN



Plan: Sell 100 QSR / Buy 100 DIN on 9/16

Lessons from Africa

The Digital Hereafter - a Virtual Afterlife





'Hey, Google! Let me talk to my departed father': New companies are creating a digital version of immortality - They're hawking and aiming for the opportunity to preserve one's legacy online forever.

Excerpt:

When Andrew Kaplan reminisces, his engrossing tales leave the impression that he has managed to pack multiple lives into a single existence: globe-trotting war correspondent in his 20s, member of the Israeli army who fought in the Six-Day War, entrepreneur and, later, author of numerous spy novels and Hollywood scripts.

Now — as the silver-haired 78-year-old unwinds with his wife of 39 years in a suburban oasis outside Palm Springs, Calif. — he has realized he would like his loved ones to have access to those stories, even when he’s no longer alive to share them.

Kaplan has agreed to become “AndyBot,” a virtual person who will be immortalized in the cloud for hundreds, perhaps thousands, of years.

If all goes according to plan, future generations will be able to “interact” with him using mobile devices or voice computing platforms such as Amazon’s Alexa, asking him questions, eliciting stories and drawing upon a lifetime’s worth of advice long after his physical body is gone.

Someday, Kaplan — who playfully refers to himself as a “guinea pig” — may be remembered as one of the world’s first “digital humans.”

“Being a pioneer at my age is kind of unexpected,” he said, “but I figured, why the hell not?”



Comment: Ha Ha! "why the hell not?"

9.01.2019

On clothing

8.28.2019

Psychotherapy gets weird ...



Now Therapists Have to Figure Out Astrology, Tarot and Psychedelics - Patients are confronting psychotherapists with a fresh pile of really useful challenges.

Excerpt:

Jonathan Kaplan, a clinical psychologist in New York, recently noticed that more and more of his clients are referring to Mercury being in retrograde.

“I’m not familiar with cosmic cycles,” he said. (Instead, his specialty is cognitive behavioral therapy.) “Nor do I try to be, but I want to understand what that means to a person and how that influences their understanding of the world.”

Now he, like many other therapists, is learning something new, to better communicate with patients. Alternative treatments, rituals and metaphysical organizing principles loom large in popular culture. Astrology and tarot cards have permeated apps and social media. Sound baths and other forms of “energy medicine” appear not only in “healing centers,” but also in hospitals.

“A lot of things in psychology were once considered edgy and alternative,” said Charlynn Ruan, a clinical psychologist and the founder of Thrive Psychology Group in California, who said she is learning about different alternative treatments and approaches. “I’m not teaching it, but I’m not saying you can’t bring this into the room. That would be disempowering and arrogant.”
Comment: Always has been in my view

8.26.2019

Google search tricks



6 Google Tricks That Will Turn You Into an Internet Detective

Excerpt:

  • Use quotation marks to find a specific phrase
  • Exclude words with the minus sign
  • Narrow your search to a specific time period
  • Search your favorite sites with the “site:” operator
  • Add search shortcuts to your browser’s address bar
  • Find the source of a photo with reverse image search

8.19.2019

8.16.2019

Matthew Eli von Ohlen